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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
a new plan to eliminate the debt ceiling, claiming the gop is exploiting the issue for political gain. doug mckelway is live in washington with more on the democratic plan and the road ahead. hi, doug. >> reporter: hi, jenna. this democratic plan in a nutshell would basically do away with the statute that calls for the debt ceiling in the first place, allowing spending in effect to go up and up and up without the artificial cap that the debt ceiling is indeed. democrats are explaining this in a press conference right now as we speak, so we'll be learning a lot more about it as the day progresses. republicans obviously deeply opposed to this thing, fearful that democrats will indeed use it to allow spending to go up and up. here is senator john barrasso speaking on fox news this morning. >> we have a spending problem in this country. people all across the country know it. they know it in wyoming. families have to balance their budget every year. many states do. we do in wyoming. it is time for the senate and the house and the president to get serious about limiting our spending and spe
's going to start off talking about the debt ceiling. he'll call for republicans to raise it without a fight. but several gop members have already said the debt ceiling is going to be where they draw a line in the sand. >>> check out the first page of politico this morning. double trouble. house gop, eyes default, shutdown. and it talks about the very real possibility that house republican members want to see the government shut down or default if they don't get the cuts they want. >>> let me bring in "times" deputy bureau chief ed o'keefe. good morning to both of you. this is all just breaking now, but the president has said and he said it consistently. he's not negotiating over the debt ceiling. michael, is this more of what we're going to hear from him today? is he going to lay the groundwork for the battle ahead? >> i think so. to some degree i think what's happening is a game of chicken unfortunately. i know the financial markets hate it. and it kind of turns your stomach a little bit. but obama has said we're absolutely not negotiating over the weekend a significant event when
for raising the debt ceiling. the house of representatives is back in session today, too, and republicans are just as adamant, insisting they won't raise the debt limit, unless the president goes along with spending cuts. let's go live to cnn white house correspondent brianna keilar. >> reporter: president obama stating very clearly today that he will not negotiate deficit reduction, tax increases and spending cuts attached to the debt ceiling. this of course does follow that bruising battle the year before last, where he did negotiate on the issue, and the u.s. nearly went to the brink of default. he said that congress has to pay the bills that it's already racked up. >> you don't go out to dinner and then, you know, eat all you want and then leave without paying the check. and if you do, you're breaking the law. and congress should think about it the same way that the american people do. you don't -- now, if congress want, to have a debate about maybe we shouldn't go out to dinner next time, maybe we should go to a more modest restaurant, that's fine. that's the debate that we should ha
a vote that will delay the debt ceiling for three months. so what they are doing, if you really look at house republicans who took the majority two years ago, they did it standing on principle for pretty much every squirmish. it seems that they are becoming a bit more sophisticated, rather, but their understanding, it seems, is that you have to pick your battles. losing credit ratings and so forth, that's not a smart battle to wage. look at some of the most conservative members of the house talking to deirdre walsh at the end of their retreat for three days about picking their battles in a better way. >> deal with the smaller ones first, maybe build up a little momentum, credibility, not only with the credit markets but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)